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Full text of "Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (1889)"

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REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 



Public Instruction 



State of Florida, 



FOR THE TEAR 









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Ending September 30th, 1889. 



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Annual Report 



Superintendent of Public Instruction, 



TOR THB SCHOOL YEAR 



ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1889. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



Offilk 
Superintendent of Public Instruction 
Tallahassee, Fla.. Dec. 31st, 1889 



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To His Excellency Francis P. Fleming, Governor of Florida : 
Sir— In obedience to the -requirements of the law, I have the 
honor and pleasure to submit my report of the work of the De- 
partment of Education for the year ending Sept. 30th, 1889. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully. 
Your obedient servant, 

ALBERT J. RUSSELL, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



REPORT. 

The continued interest, progress, and improvement, in the 
system of public instruction throughout tne entire State is exceed- 
ingly gratifying and of brilliant promise for the future; indeed, 
it may be said that no other interest has a greater hold upon the 
appreciation of the people, nor are they less enthusiastic notwith- 
standing the rapid and almost phenomenal growth of the system, 
supplying the needs of the State in nearly every ( neighborhood, 
the effort is to increase the facilities, adopt the new and approved 
methods of imparting instruction, and making the school room 
really attractive, and winsome to the pupils. 

Building new school houses still continues in most counties; 
these are erected with strict regard to light and ventilation and 
the health and comfort of the children, while nearly all school 
houses are being supplied with improved furniture, the purchase 
of which the school years 1 887-1 888, and 1888-1889, has far 
surpassed any preceding year. 



THE NEW LAW. 

The new school law passed into force with far less friction than 
could have been expected; since the organization of the system was 
changed in many particulars, the machinery is far less cumber- 
some, much simplified, and less expensive to the school fund; 
the schools of the entire Slate moved off with great smoothness, 
and the large correspondence, resulting naturally unon such a 
change, clearly evidences the very decided approval of county 
school officers and people; of course there are some disposed to 
find fault, but they are comparatively few, and in most cases 
were among those who found fault with the old law. 

SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS. 

Some towns, villiages and school neighborhoods have availed 
themselves of the constitutional provision, and for which the law 
has provided, and have been upon petition erected into special 
school districts and have by vote levied the special tax provided 
for, and are building finer school houses and supplying better fa- 
cilities, apparatus, etc This does not remove them either from 
the control of, or the benefit received from , the public school 
system of the State, the special district, the special ux being 
supplemental to the general fund and support of such schools; 
of course the law applies only upon the petition of the people, 
those who pay a tax upon real or personal property. 

HARVEST. 

The school interests of the State are really now in the condi- 
tion of the prudent and thrifty farmer's crops; the soil has been 
thoroughly prepared, the seed have been carelully and properly 
sown, the germs have sprung, so that to protect, guard, and di- 
rect, and the whole State must reap and gather a Ijarvest for the 
grand future coming to it, of men and women, citizens better 
prepared and qualified for the questions of the future and its 
dudes and responsibilities, and discharge them with honor and 
blessing. 

INCREASE OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The increase of the public schools [had been so great each 
succeeding year during the five years previous to this that it was 
not expected there would be still an increase, or that the counties 
were supplied with such a number of schools as that there was 
no reason why every child in the State of school age could not 
avail itself of the privileges of the school with at most a slight in- 
convenience in the length of walk in going to the school and 
returning. 



s 

Yet the increase reported by the County Superintendents for 
1 888- 1 889 is 49 schools. 

The whole number of schools being 2, 289 

The number of white schools ' . . 1,691 

The number of negro schools 598 

Total number of youths of school age 113,647 

Total number of white youths of school age 60.782 

Total number of negro youths of school age . ... 52,865 

Total enrollment of youths on school register £6,390 

Total enrollment of white youths on school register . . 531608 

Total enrollment of negro youths on school register . . 32,782 

Average daily attendance . 63,652 

Whole number of teachers employed 2,413 

Whole number of .white teachers 1,718 

Whole number of riegro teachers 694 

More detailed statistical information may be had by reference 
to tables at the close of the report. 

The difference in the number of schools for the white youth 
and the negro, as well as in the number of negro teachers is ac- 
counted for in the fact that the negroes have to a large extent left 
the rural districts and farms and are congregated in and around 
the cities, towns and villages, and in the fact also that in several 
of the counties there are not enough of them to make more than 
one school, and in two or three counties no school at all, and in 
the cities and towns they are gathered into large schools with 
several teachers, while the whites are occupying the rural dis- 
tricts scattered all over the county and require many schools, 
though small in number of pupils. 

HOW SUPPORTED. 

For the year there was raised upon the county tax 
by the various counties and expended for the 
maintenance of the public schools $363,490.00 

There was also from the constitutional tax of one 

mill 76,000.00 

And from the interest upon the common school 

fund 37,000.00 



Making a total of expenditure for schools of . . . $476,490.00 

Making the cost per capita of education of the youth of school 
age $4. 10+ and the cost of those enrolled upon the school reg- 
isters per capita $5.50+ it will be seen in the foregoing that the 
people of Florida are nobly doing their own work in the educa- 
tion of their children, with the exception of the $37,000 accru- 
ing from the proceeds of lands, the property of the schools. 



THE SCHOOJ.S AS TO POPULATION. 

Taking the present number of schools, viz; 2,289, andj plac- 
ing the population of the State at 400,000 (the semi-decennial 
census of 1885 gave it at 338,406), and Florida has a public 
school whose door is open without let or hindrance to every 
child of the school age, to every 174+ of her population, old and 
young, white and negro; no other State or country can make such 
a showing as to the number of schools and population. 

The system is simple, efficient and easy of administration. 
The county officers, though many of them are not professional 
teachers, are earnest, excellent business men, heartily in accord 
with the great work of popular education, and are diligent and 
jealous of all the benefits belonging to or imparted by the schools. 
The people are enthused and deeply interested, and are heartily 
co-operating in the work; almost complete harmony prevails, 
while the leading demand is, help us to improve still. 

COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Our present :plan is to organize and operate one high school in 
each county in the State, and if needed, as the county shall grow 
populous and wealthy, more, to be located at the county site; this 
is provided for in the law, or some more eligible, central place 
where health and surroundings are desirable; these high schools 
while serving the locality or district in which they are located, as 
the common graded school of the district are to be open to any 
and every youth who may advance to the grade necessary upon 
entering the high school course in their own local school, free 
of any charge whatever except for books and school necessities. 
These high schools are designed to fit the pupil for business life, 
or prepare them for entrance into the colleges of the State or else- 
where, and it is expected that the peop'e living near these schools 
will arrange for boarding these pupils from other parts of their 
counties at as low a rate as possible. 

These schools have been already opened and successfully ope- 
rated in several of the more progressive counties and are the ad- 
miration of the people, and are doing an excellent work; doubt- 
less, it will not be long before every county in the State will 
enjoy the privilege of one or more of these valuable features of 
the school system of Florida. 

GRADES IN THE SCHOOLS. 

The courses of study in the graded school are so arranged as 
to embrace the entire study in eight years, the grades being 
in number eight, beginning with the primary work and complet- 
ing the Arithmetic, U. S. History, Political and Physical Geog- 
raphy, and English Grammar. The pupil entering when six years 
of age, will thus have taken the full course of the common school, 
and pass out at the age of fourteen years. If the parents of the 



pupil desire him to take the high school course he enters, and the 
course in that requires four years, and the pupil is through at the 
age of eighteen years. This relieves the State's system of public 
instruction of that charge of over-work for the pupil or of cram- 
ing the mind to the injury of both it and the body, and the pupil 
will leave the grammar school at a very suitable age to learn any 
one of the mechanic trades, or the high school at an appropriate 
age to enter and acquire a business knowledge, or go to college 
for preparation for one of the learned professions if desired. The 
law enacted at the session of the Legislature of iSSq makes it 
obligatory upon the school authorities to require to be taught in 
every public school in their respective counties Elementary Phys- 
iology, especially as it relates to alcoholic stimulants and narcot- 
ics, and they are required to examine every teacher upon this 
important subject before issuing them certificates as acceptable 
teachers. 

The State Board of Education has urged upon all school offi- 
cers and teachers to labor for and devise some plan whereby some 
knowledge at least of tools and tool-craft may be imparted to 
the boys of the public schools, and such knowledge of a practi- 
cal character may be given to the girls as may be useful to them 
in after-life, 

The people of Florida may be congratulated upon their sys- 
tem of public schools, and the vast and good work being done 
by them and upon the future development of the State, in all 
that goes to make a grand State and people characterized by an 
intelligent industry and consequent thrift. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

The institutions of the State are the Florida Agricultural 
College, the West Florida Seminary and the East Florida Semi- 
nary, the State College for the training of white teachers, and a 
similar college for training colored teachers, and the Institute for 
the Blind and Deaf-mutes. 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

This college is located at Lake City in Columbia county, 
and is designated to give a full course of agricultural scientific 
knowledge, embracing Agricultural Chemistry, Pomology and 
practical work in field, grove and orchard; a literary and classical 
course, leading to the degree of A. B., and special courses in 
Civil Engineering and field Surveying, and in the mechanic arts 
and tool-craft An excellent Faculty has been placed in charge, 
large and commodious college buildings and dormitories have 
been erected, and furnished and equipped in each of their special 
requirements, and supplied with scientific apparatus and appli- 
ances, a large and well selected library, and is now ready for the 
Agricultural, Literary and Mechanical education of young men. 



s 

There has this college year been matriculated one hundred and 
sixty young men. 

The school is, by the law creating it, one in which military 
tactics and science must be taught, and is under military 
discipline and system, this though an excellent feature of a sound 
education is by no means paramount but subordinate, and sup- 
plements the main features of the college work, to-wit: the Agri- 
cultural, Literary and Mechanical courses of study. 

For a more detailed and complete statement of its work I 
refer to the following letter from the President, Prof. F. L. 
Kern. 

Lake City, Fla., Dec. 31, 1889. 

Hon. A, J. Russell, State Superintendent Public Instruction and 
President Board of Trustees Florida State Agricultural College, 
Tallahassee, Fla.: 

Dear Sm — Responding to your inquiry as to the condition of 
our State college, and such information as might prove interesting 
to persons outside of the State, I have the pleasure to say that 
this college is enjoying great prosperity and rapidly growing in 
favor with the people, as evidenced by the rapid and almost 
phenomenal growth during the past year. One hundred and 
sixty young men are now in attendance, and, at the rate of increase 
during the past year, we shall number 300 before the close of the 
present session. 

The college is so well equipped with fine buildings, appa- 
ratus, and teaching force that the students may receive a thor- 
ough and practical preparation for the responsible duties of society 
and business at the least possible expense consistent with comfort 
and health. Good board at the barracks does not exceed $8 a 
month. Cadets are charged only half fare on all Florida rail- 
roads. 

The acts of Congress and of the Legislature of Florida re- 
quire that military science and tactics shall constitute a part of 
our curriculum, and this department has lately been placed under 
the charge of Lieut. C^-G. Morton, an experienced officer of 
the regular army, detailed by the secretary of war for service in 
the Florida State College, The students have been uniformed, 
armed and organized into a battalion of cadets for military in- 
struction and discipline, arid the spirit, zeal and energy displayed 
by the students in their new relations, amply prove that the mil- 
itary feature is as popular as it is conducive to a sound physical 
and mental development. 

Lake City, the seat of the college, a town of about two thous- 
and inhabitants, and the county seat of Columbia county, is situa- 
ted at the junction ot' theF. C. & P. and G. S &F. railroads, fifty- 
nine miles west of Jacksonville. It was selected by the board 



of trustees, among other reasons, on account of its well-known 
health fulness and accessibility. Malarial fevers and epidemics 
are unknown to the town, and the rate of mortality has for years 
been not over one- half of i per cent. 

The sixth session began on 'October i, 1889, to continue 
thirty-six weeks, there being three terms, tiie -first ending at 
Christmas, the second on March 21, 1890, and the third on June 
13, 1890. 

A course in agriculture is now in progress, and instruction is 
given by means of lectures, explanations in the field, and the use 
of text-books when available for the purpose. 

Practical illustrations are furnished throughout the term, and 
each student has the opportunity not only of witnessing the 
various operations in farm, garden and orchard, but of taking a 
hand himself, and thereby become familiar with the use of 
implements and learn the true value of well-directed labor. 

The library consists of about 2,000 volumes of choice books 
of reference, scientific manuals, biographies, histories, encyclo- 
pedias and governmental works of great value to the students of 
such a college. 

A large and beautiful room has recently been fitted up with 
tables and racks containing files of leading dailies and weeklies, 
educational, agricultural, religious and scientific monthlies, and 
many of the leadiug magazines and works of literature and art. 
The library and reading room are open to the cadets during the 
entire day. 

Tuiion is free to all the citizens of Florida; of all other stu- 
dents a tuition fee of $30 per session will be required, payable 
one-half October t, or upon entrance, and one-half on March 
20, 1890. 

There is no charge for use of rooms, which are supplied with 
plain furniture made by the cadets in the manual training depart- 
ment, consisting of single bed and mattress, wash-stand, study 
table and book-case. There is also furnished a stove, chairs, 
washbowl, pitcher and looking-glass. 

The total cost to each student for a session of thirty-six weeks 
including two uniforms, should not exceed one hundred and 
twenty ($120) dollars. 

A $ro,8oo appropriation having been made by the recent 
Legislature, a handsome and commodious brick barracks building, 
fully equipped for rooming and boarding cadets, is just completed. 
The Florida experiment station is conducted on the college 
farm of over 100 acres of fertile land. Under the directorship 
of Rev. Jas. P. DePass this station is becoming a success. The 
laboratory building and station headquarters is a fine three-story 
building well adapted and furnished for this work. The manual 
training department is under the charge of a skilled professor in 



/ 



to 

this important line of the new education, and is conducted in a 
separate building furnished with full equipment of tools, engine, 
eta Abou' half of the students take th ; s course. 

The college printing office is folly equipped with two good 
presses, a large cutting machine, and a full line of plain and orna- 
mental tvpe, so that any cadet may become a practical printer 
in a short time without any expense. 

Besides a full agricultural and mechanical course there is 
a full collegiate course of four years in the classics, modern lan- 
guages, English literature, mathematics and science. The 
former course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and the 
latter to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. There is also a sub- 
collegiate department where those unfit to enter the regular col- 
legiate courses may have a thorough and special training in the 
common branches. Applicants must be not younger than 14 
years to enter the preparatory department. The faculty consists 
of a full corps of competent professors, each one especially 
adapted and qualified for his department of work. We shall be 
pleased to furnish a complete catalogue to any address. 

F. L. Kf.rn, President. 

The West Florida Seminary, located at Tallahassee, is a most 

excellent school, and is from year to year increasing in the qual- 
ity and effectiveness of its work. Its curriculum begins with 
a preparatory or academic course, and gives a full college course, 
leading to the degrees of A. B, and B. S. 

An excellent feature of this school is that both sexes are ad- 
mitted and share the same opportunities, and the writer feels 
that he can truthfully say no better opportunity is afforded for 
the education of young men or women, especially the latter, and 
under our own genial and sale climate and in the midst of ad- 
mirable social and religious influence. 

The Legislature of 1S89 appropriated $15,000,00 for the 
purpose of building a new edifice and dormitory, in addition to 
the present buildings, which, when complete and furnished and 
equipped, will be second to but few in the South. 

For more detailed information I refer to the letter of the 
President, Col. Geo. M. Edgar, following: 

Seminary West of Suwannee River, \ 
Tallahassee, Ft. a., Dec. 31, 1889. j 

Hon. A. J. Russell, State Superintendent of Public Instruction: 

Dear Sir — I am sorry that I have so little time in which to 
respond to your inquiries in regard to the aims, condition and 
prospects of the seminary. I can only say, briefly, that the in- 
stitution was designed by its charter to afford both general and 



II 

technical training, but especially training for teachers, farmers 
and those looking to mechanical pursuits. The provisions of 
the charter are ample to warrant its development into a univer- 
sity, but the means at the disposal of the Board of Education 
have never been adequate to maintain an institution pf multiform 
aims. It has, therefore, been thought best to limit its efforts, 
for the present, to supplying a good general education, and the 
board has accordingly adopted two literary courses — one leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts and the other to that of Bach- 
elor of Letters. It will be seen from the catalogue of 1889-90 
that these curricula will bear favorable comparison with those of 
some of our best colleges, the design being to afford a symmetrical 
training of the powers of the mind by the use of the English, 
Latin, Greek, German and French ■ languages, mathematics, 
physiology and the physical sciences as instruments, in such 
proportion and by the employment of such methods of instruc- 
tion as the experience of the ablest educators has shown will best 
subserve this end. 

There are six regular classes, two high school and four colle- 
giate, and a preparatory class, the design being, as near as 
possible, to begin the training of a youth where the average 
common school leaves it off. 

The faculty consists of five instructors, men and women of 
liberal culture and exceptional worth, and chosen with reference 
to their fitness to teach special branches. 

The recent appropriation of $15,000 by the Legislature will 
enable the board to enlarge and beautify the buildings and add 
appreciably to the appliances of the institution, affording ampler 
facilities for illustration and research, larger accommodations, 
greater comfort to the students and teachers, and more, attrac- 
tive surroundings. 

Tuition is free to all Florida students. Non-residents of the 
State are charged $20 per term of eighteen weeks. Board may 
be had in private families at from $12 to (20 per month. It is 
the hope of the management to provide cheaper board at an 
early day. The doors of the institution are open to both sexes, 
and many girls and young ladies are availing themselves of the 
superior advantages which it affords. 

It is the aim of the Board of Education lo secure to the youth 
of the State, free of charge, the best literary and scientific train- 
ing, so as to make tt unnecessary for any youth to go beyond the 
limits of the State to be educated. 

It is a matter of congratulation to the people that the efforts 
of thq| board to carry out this aim, begin two years ago in the -»c- 
reorganization of the institution and in' raising its standard, are 
bearing fruit in the increased respect for the institution and in , 
the doubling of its patronage; and it is hoped that it may ever 



prove a potent factor in promoting educational progress and a 
love of sound learning in our State. 

But the board would not limit the blessings it dispenses to 
the youth of the State, but invites all parents who seek health or 
pleasure in the charming climate of the Tallahassee country, and 
among the refined and hospitable citizens of our capital city to 
bring their sons and daughters with them to enter the seminary, 
where they may receive the best educational advantages, while 
both enjoy the genial warmth of our pertect winters free from 
the anxiety incident to Ion" separation. 

The number of matriculates this year is eighty. 

George M. Edgar. 

EAST FLORIDA SEMINARY 

Is located at Gainesville, and is also an excellent school, having 
earnest and admirably qualified teachers. 

Its scope of work is to thoroughly prepare young men and 
women for a business life, and prepare them to enter the univer- 
sities and colleges of the State and country, and qualify them- 
selves for the learned professions. One of its leading features is . 
Military Tactics and Science, in which it is said to be the equal 
of any school in the South. From year to year, for a number of 
years past, it has had as students as gallant a corps of young 
men and as promising young women as can be found in any 
school anywhere. It has done, and is still doing, an excellent 
work for the State, and deserves a large patronage and the 
hearty co-operation of the people. 

For further and more detailed information, I refer to the 
letter from the President, Col. Edwin P. Cater, following : 



Gainesville, Fla., December 21, 1889. 

Hon. A. J. Russell, State Superintendent of Publtc Instruction, 
Tallahassee, Fla. : 

Dear Sir — In response to your valued favor of the 21st 
instant, 1 inclose the paper you requested me to write, and hope 
you will be able to use it to advantage. 

Respectfully yours, 

Edwin P. Cater, 
Superintendent East Florida Seminary. 

East Florida Seminary is a State military school, located in 
Gainesville, Alachua county, Florida. This location is central, 
accessible, and noted for its healthfulness. The seminary build- 
ings, consisting of an academic building and a dormitory for the 
residence of teachers and students, are handsome, commodious, 
and admirably adapted to the purposes of literary work and the 



*3 

requirements of a military regime. The arrangements for heat- 
ing and lighting the buildings have been pronounced by compe- 
tent judges to be of the very best, and the system of sanitation 
has been endorsed as excellent by the highest medical authorities 
of Florida. The rooms in the dormitory building, intended for 
the occupancy of cadets, are supplied with all necessary furni- 
ture, including neat single iron bedsteads, commodious ward- 
robes, etc. 

The study-hall and class-rooms in the academic building are 
fitted up with the very best modern school furniture, and the 
physical and chemical apparatus is sufficient for illustrating the 
work in natural science. 

There is an admirably selected library, consisting for the 
most part of books of reference and standard historical works. 

The instructors are persons of liberal education, of culture 
and refinement, and they are doing earnest and efficient work 
in the class-rooms and in the general routine of seminary duties. 

The seminary has been most fortunate in securing from the 
Secretary of the Navy the detail of Lieutenant Charles S. Ripley, 
United States Navy, as military instructor and commandant of 
cadets. This officer comes to the school with high and varied 
qualifications gathered from the training received at the United 
States naval academy at Annapolis, from his tours of duty with 
the navy, which carried him to nearly all the important ports of 
the world, and from details for service in connection with the 
majrine and coast surveys of the government of the United 
States. His acquirements in modern languages, in marine sur- 
veying and civil engineering, and in accurate and varied geo- 
graphical knowledge, have all been generously placed at the 
service of the seminary, and their full benefit will be secured to 
the students. 

The present session, which began September 26, 1889, is 
the most prosperous in the history of the seminary. Up to 
November 25th there have been enrolled eighty-seven cadets 
and thirty young ladies, representing eighteen counties of Florida 
and the States of Indiana, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas and 
Louisiana. These numbers are increasing weekly. 

The drills and military instruction are not allowed to inter- 
fere with academic work, only one hour daily — the hour just 
before sundown — being devoted to these duties. Used in this 
way, the military organization has proved to be a most efficient 
aid to the formation of habits of systematic duty. 

The expenses are very moderate. The entrance and tui- 
tion fees amount to $25; the room rent and gas bill to $12 ; 
washing, $12; books, stationery, fuel, etc., about $12, all tht 
above for the entire session; and table board costs $2.50 per 
week. 



14 

The uniform outfit, consisting of one dress and one undress 
suit, with belts, dress helmet, undress cap, and a straw helmet. 
costs $36. go. The dress suit, properly taken care of, will last two 
or more years, and, if outgrown, may be disposed of to other cadets. 

No tuition fees are charged in the case of students who hold 
county appointments. 

The seminary regime, combining as it does academic work 
with military exercises, succeeds most admirably in sending out 
the students strong in mind and in body to the duties of life. 
Several students from States of the northwest have entered the 
school in aim >st invalid condition, a>id have returned to their 
homes in the enjoyment of robust health. 

The school has a complete supply of infantry arms and 
accoutrements, and the artillery platoon is equipped with the 
section of a light battery from the department of the Navy. 

These seminaries are, in the main, as is the State Agricul- 
tural College, supported by the proceeds of the sales ol land 
given by the Congress of the United States for their endowment. 
The college has an invested fund of $155,400, and the two 
seminaries a fund of $90,000 and several thousand acres 01 land 
yet to be sold. 

The State has from time to time made liberal appropriations 
for each of these institutions, enabling them to build commo- 
dious buildings and equip them suitably for the purposes of a 
higher education until they are now prepared to compete with 
institutions of learning of their grade anywhere. 

STATE NORMAL COLLEGE FOR WHITE TEACHERS. 

This college, as its name implies, is for the training of white 
persons, of either sex, for the profession of teaching, and is 
provided for in the constitution and put into operation by enact- 
ment of the Legislature. 

It is now in the third year of its work, having graduated a 
class of thirteen at the close of the session of 1887 — 18S8, every 
one of whom were employed in the schools of the State and 
have been successfully at work. 

The Legislature of 1889 appropriated a fund for the purpose 
of building a college building, which has been completed, and 
is now in use. 

I refer with great pleasure to the letter of the President of 
the college, Prof. H. N. Felkel, following : 

DeFuniak Springs, Fla., December 31, 1889. 

Hon. A. J. RusseU, State Superintendent of Public Instruction : 

Sir — Yours, asking for a report of the institution of which I 
have charge, is at hand, and I beg, in response, to submit the 
following : 



is 

For the first two years that the normal school was operated, 
as you are aware, we were without a home, the building occu- 
pied being the property of the Florida Chautauqua Association. 
It is with gratification, however, that I am now able to Teport 
that we are comfortably provided for in this respect. The last 
Legislature made an appropriation to be applied to the construc- 
tion of a college building, and though the amount was not so 
large as asked for. yet, by judicious management, we have 
erected a commodious, well-arranged house. The structure is 
cruciform in shape and Grecian in its style of architecture. The 
main body of the cross is eighty feet in length and thirty in 
breadth, the arms each being twenty by twenty-five feet. This 
gives four recitation rooms which, under our present plan of 
classification, will enable us to accommodate one hundred and 
fifty students. 

The enrollment to date numbers eighty- three students, rep- 
resenting all sections of the State. This, we think, very grati- 
fying, considering the short period of time since our organization. 

As to our future prospects, I feel assured in saying that our 
popularity and attendance will continue to increase. One of 
the reasons which justifies this statement is the prominent posi- 
tions taken in the schools of the State by those graduating here 
the past scholastic year. There is shown by this that a demand 
exists for well equipped teachers, and until this demand is met 
there will be work for a State normal school. 

I should have stated, in connection with our building, that 
it is situated on a large, eligible lot of over five acres in extent, 
and commands a beautiful view of charming fields and orchards. 
This was donated to the State for the purpose by Hon. A. R. 
Jones, who has shown himself one of the staunchest friends of 
the college. 

H. N. Felkel, President. 

Precisely the same character of school is provided for the 
training of colored teachers for the colored schools, it has become 
a settled policy in the State that competent colered teachers shall 
be employed to teach the colored children and youth, therefore 
the Legislature recognized the necessity of training and prepar- 
ing them for their work, and it was promptly done; a very con- 
siderable number of matriculates have entered, it was found 
necessary to do a large amount of acedemic work still, in order 
to properly equip these students for the normal course. 

The Faculty is an excellent one, painstaking, earnest and 
devoted, are devoid of the love of eclat which seems to control 
many schools for the race, but are striving to do a work for 
their race which will fit them for the actual work of life and send 
these out to do a similar work for the youths. 



i6 

I refer to the letter of the president for further information 
which follows: 

Tallahassee, Fla., Dec. 31, 1889. 

Hon. A. J Russell, Superintendent Publk Instruction, State iff 
Florida, Tallahassee, Fla.: 

Sir — I am in receipt of your favor of even date asking for 
a brief sketch of the above-named institution, and I have th* 
honor to submit in reply the following statements: 

In accordance with the provisions of the constitution of 1885, 
the Florida State Normal College for the training of colored 
teachers was established by act of the Legislature bearing date 
May 31, iSii;, and it was organized October 3, of the same year. 
On account ol the insufficient acquirements of many of the 
applicants it has been found necesarv to do much academic work, 
and to supply that deficiency the course of study has been divided 
into preparatory and normal work. 

In the normal course, the work covers as fully as the time 
allowed (two years) will permit, Latin, higher mathematics, 
natural, mental and moral philosophy, physiology, astronomy, 
general history, rhetoric, pedagogics, etc 

The preparatory department gives the elements of algebra 
and Latin and a thorough review of the common school branches 
in addition to music, drawing, bookkeeping, etc. 

From a beginning with fifteen students the number has 
steadily increased until at present the total number of matricu- 
lates exceeds ninety. 

One of the chief drawbacks to the growth of the school in 
numbers has been the inability of tht Faculty to guarantee 
accommodations for students from abroad. Fortunately, through 
the liberality of the last Legislature and the supplemental aid of 
the friends of the institution, this defect is about to be remedied 
and the school, no longer an experiment, will take its place 
among the permanent and successful features of our thriving 
educational system. 

The current expenses of the school are paid by annual appro- 
priation of $4,000. The present college building is a comfortable 
and attractive edifice, erected for the purpose, and well supplied 
with modern furniture and appliances. On the first of next 
January the students will go into dormitories, furnished for the 
first time by the State, and the large number of active teachers, 
who hasten to avail themselves of the advantages of the special 
training immediately after the close of their own schools, will 
thus be accommodated cheaply and well. 

T. DeS. Tucker, President 



17 

The Institute for the Blind and Deaf-mute, now in its sixth 
year of work, has steadily increased in its usefulness among the 
most afflicted of the children of the State, of whom there are 
eighty-three blind and eighty-seven deaf-mutes of the school 
age, between six and twenty-one years. 

Up to this date thirty of these afflicted ones have availed 
themselves of the inestimable privilege of this school, in which 
are all the required facilities for their training, under as fine a 
faculty of instructors as can be found, in whose care wonderful 
progress has been made by most of the pupils, several of whom, 
among the younger, have been taught to articulate, to speaK and 
read orally, so that those who have heard them have been both 
amazed and delighted. 

■ -By an appropriation made by the last Legislature the build- 
ings, study-rooms, dormitories and grounds have been much 
improved and beautified. A work-shop has been erected for the 
instruction of boys in carpentry and cabinet work. It is further 
designed to teach the art of printing and other useful trades and 
occupations to both boys and girls, and thus equip them for 
lifes work enabling them to earn a livelihood independently. 
The following letter from the Principal contains valuable and 
interesting information relative to the school to which I refer 
with pleasure : 

St. Augustine, Fla., Dec. 31, 1889. 

To the Hon. A. J. Russell* Secretary of the Board of Managers of 
the Florida Institute for the Deaf and the Blind : 

Sir— I herewith present a general report of the condition 
of the school under my charge and the progress made the 
past year. 

The opening of the school last term was much delayed on 
account of the epidemic at Jacksonville, and but few pupils 
arrived before January 1st of the present year. During January 
and February twenty-three pupils were enrolled and continued 
to the end of the year. 

At the present writing pupils are still coming, and the 
attendance will be considerably larger than at any time in the past. 

This increase is due to the efforts of the Florida Association 
for the Promotion of the Education of the Deaf and Blind. 
This society was organized last March for the purpose of seeking 
out the deaf and the blind children of the State, and providing 
transportation to the school whenever it was found that parents 
or friends were unable to do so. 

The society is now doing good work, though much hindered 
the first part of the term for want of an agent who could devote 
his whole time to the work of the society. 

The completion of the addition to the officer's quarters has 



added, not only to the appearance of the group of buildings, 
but to the general convenience -as well 

The slight alterations in dormitories and school-rooms have 
quite doubled the capacity, and much simplified the work of 
those whose duty it is to supervise the children out ol school hours. 
With the artesian water conducted to every part of the 
grounds through iron pipes, the making of lawns is a compara- 
tively easy matter. Little by little, as the boys find time from 
their other duties, the work of planting grass goes on, and 
another year will find all the front part of the grounds a 
beautiful green. A few dollars expended for plants and shrubs 
would add greatly to the appearance of the place. 

The work of preparing a course of study suited to the needs 
of the deaf and the blind has been attended to, but I have little 
hope of seeing a class graduate from the school for the reason 
that parents, as soon as their children acquire the merest rudi- 
ments of an education, finding them so much more useful at 
home, take them from school and install them in kitchen, factory 
and field, that they may add a few hard earned dollars to the 
family exchequer, 

I make no comment on this, though my heart burns with 
indig nation. The State can remedy this state of affairs by legis- 
lation, and I trust that the next Legislature will do so. 

The general health of the pupils has been excellent. It may 
be proper here to state that it is by no means an inconsiderable 
part of our work to build up and infuse new strength and vigor 
into the bodies as well as minds of our pupils. In order to do 
this we provide a liberal, but by no means sumptuous, bill of 
fare, especial attention being bestowed on the cooking. The 
result is that our pupils, without exception, improve in general 
health throughout the year and are in condition to advance 
steadily and rapidly in their studies. 

Too much importance cannot be attributed to the domestic 
department of the school, nor too much praise bestowed on 
those who by their devotion to its proper administration have 
made possible the extremely satisfying results obtained in the 
other departments. • 

In the school-room we are beginning to realize what the 
harvest will be which seemed so far off when we were sowing the 
seed in patience and painstaking drill-work. Our work is still 
primary, the most advanced pupils having had less than three 
full years of instruction, but we are sufficiently advanced to 
prove that our system is a success beyond a shadow of a doubt. 
In this department, also, has devoted labor seen its own reward 
in the opening of dumb lips and enabling the blind to read. 

The following changes have been made in the corps of 
officers : 



19 

Miss Elizabeth Laughead, teacher, resigned on account of 
failing health, her place being filled temporarily by Miss Alice 
Terrell. 

Mrs. R. K, Terrell, matron, and Miss E. W. Eppes, assistant 
matron, resigned at the end of the year, and their places were 
rilled by the appointment of Miss Blanche Blake and Mrs. W. 
H. Leffler. After a short trial, Miss Blake finding the responsi- 
bility too great, resigned, and Miss Eppes is filling her place. 

Mr. J. A. Marshall, our supervisor, resigned at the end of 
the year, and Mr. W- P. Leffler, appointed as supervisor and 
instructor in caipentry. 

Miss Laura Simms wai appointed at the beginning of the 
present term as teacher o( the blind, and Miss Sophia Macmil 
Ian as teacher of the deaf, both of whom, though new to the 
work, are by their earnest devotion to their duties earning that 
success which only comes to the faithful worker. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Park Terrell, Principal. 

INDUSTRIAL TRAINING AND TOOL-CRAFT. 

The State Board of Education has been convinced for some 
time past of the importance and necessity of imparting some 
knowledge at least in this most useful and needed line of knowl- 
edge, and in j886 issued among the regulations for the Depart- 
ment of Education, made under the command and authority of 
the law, the following; 

*■ Regulation 7. — The State Board of Education are deeply 
impressed with the fact that the large majority of the children in 
attendance upon the public schools are children of the poorer 
people, and will fill the large and important classes of farmers, 
workmen, mechanics, and artisans of the State, and that to im- 
part to them only the knowledge to be derived from the school 
books, excellent and necessary as it is, will but illy equip them 
for the sphere of life to which in Providence and circumstances 
they are very sure to be called, are still more impressed with the 
nesessity of imparting to them some knowledge {to boys especial- 
ly) of the useful and necessary -tools and implements used in the 
arts and trades, and to the girls some training in sewing, cookery 
and housewifery in general, by simple illustrative lectures or 
talks upon their use and the general principles involved, so 
that a taste may be cultivated for these very useful and important 
vocations in life and some knowledge imparted of them, but 
mainly to impress them with a true and proper conception 
of the honor and dignity of honest labor. County Superinten- 
dents and Boards of Public Instruction are urgently and especially 
called upon to give their earnest attention to this very impor- 
tant feature of school work and instruction." ■ 



30 

These officers have not moved as readily in this important 
work as had been hoped, yet it is thoroughly understood how 
difficult it is to graft this on to the public school systems. It is a 
question in the minds of the most earnest and foremost educators 
of the nation whether it can be done at all profitably, and that the 
true plan is to form separate schools for this class of instruction. 
This it appears, would thwart the need in its greatest element as 
indicated in the regulation above referred to and quoted, that the 
majority of the children are the children of the poor, who are 
most in need and who of necessity drop out of school at an early 
period to enter the ranks of the bread- earners. 

Another hindering cause is the difficulty in obtaining teach- 
ers for the puplic schools who are qualified to impart such in- 
struction to pupils. 

I am glad, however to report that a beginning has been made 
in Florida and that work has been done for three years on this 
line. The Board of Trustees have established an Industrial and 
Trade Department at the Agricultural College; the teachers at 
the normal colleges are required to take this instruction so as to 
be qualified to impart it, while several schools in the larger cit- 
ies and towns are giving it — the fine school at Pensacola, the 
colored scho 1 1 at Jacksonville assisted by the Slater Fund, and 
several other schools throughout the State. 

REFORMATORY SCHOOL. 

I beg to call the attention of the Legislature through your 
excellency to the absolute need of a school for the reformation 
and, at the same time, the education of vagrant and vicious boys 
and girls many of whom are orphans and friendless and are thus 
left to drift away into crime and vice, and before they are men 
and women are ripend for the Jail and brothel. 

The public schools cannot do this work. The introduction of 
this element into their numbers would but work ruin, for as the 
little lump of leven is used to illustrate the growth and spread of 
a good influence, so the introduction of vice and evil will, against 
all effort corrupt many. 

Our public schools have earned a character for purity, good 
morals and excellent discipline, the objection on the part of many 
in the past to them, because of a supposed want of these qual- 
ities, has been overcome, and the children of the refined and 
best parentage are now found in attendance upon them, while 
the virtuous and respectable poor are their class-mates, and if a 
pupil is found incorrigibly vicious he is expelled. 

These and other circumstances cry aloud for a school of the 
kind suggested, located in a place secluded from city life and in- 
fluences, where the vices of these almost lost ones may be eradi- 
cated, new character built, trades taught, the soil tilled intelli- 
gently, and they may at last, under the blessing of God be turn- 



21 

ed out good men and women in love with their new lives and 
opportunities. Money appropriated for this purpose could not 
be more wisely or humanely expended. 

INSTITUTES, 

The Legislature of 1 889 refused to make the annual appro- 
priation for teachers' institutes which had been an item in the 
general appropriation bill since the term of office of my prede- 
cessor, Hon. E. K. Foster, Of course the State Superintendent 
could not hold and conduct institutes without the means with 
which to defray the expense of them. 

Notwithstanding this failure or refusal on the part of the Legis- 
lature 10 provide for them, so great was the appreciation of the 
people, school officers and teachers, that several of the counties 
have held them with great success; among them have been Ala- 
chua, Escambia, Duval, Sumter, Lake, Putnam, Volusia, Orange, 
Brevard, Hillsborough, Levy and others, while the following 
reports from superintendents show, in every instance, the bene- 
ficial effects upon the schools, in the work of the teachers and 
the spirit and improvement of the pupils. A State Teachers' 
Institute was held in March 1889 at DeFuniak Springs, which 
was largely attended, and from which great benefit was derived, 
and teachers returned to such schools as were not closed reinvig. 
orated, encouraged and with new thought, ambition and resolve. 

ARBOR DAY. 

In obedience to your proclamation setting apart the 14th day 
of February as Arbor Day, I issued instructions to the various 
county superintendents, calling upon them to see that the day 
was used not only in planting trees, but in inculcating the 
healthful, moral and useful lessons to be learned from the trees 
and forests, of the wisdom and mercy of God in His plan of 
making our beautiful earth a healthy and happy habitation, and 
to report the results of the day's observance to me as soon as 
possible thereafter, which is as follows : 

Twenty five counties have reported results in participating. 

Number of schools having exercises 476 

Number of pupils participating 13,468 

Number of patrons visiting 3i3°9 

Number of trees planted 5.353 

These trees are reported as forest trees, oaks, cedars, magno- 
lia, hickory and gum; in addition to these are many fruit trees, 
flowering shrubs and ornamental plants in the school yards 
In addition to these exercises and tree planting at the school 
premises the county superintendents report the visiting and 
cleaning of several church premises, and burial places, and the 
planting of flowers and shrubs, thus beautifying the lonely cities 
of the dead. 



22 

Appropriate exercises and planting trees was observed at the 
Agricultural College, the East and West Florida Seminaries, the 
State Normal Colleges for both white and negro teachers, and 
the Institute for the Blind and Deaf-mutes. 

. TABLES. 

For a detailed report, statistically and financially, I refer to 
the tables at the close, which will show the number of children 
of school age, the number enrolled, the number in daily 
average attendance, the amount of tax received by counties and 
by the State, and accruing from the invested common school 
fund, and expended for the school year 1 888-1 88 9, ending 
September 30th, 1889. ' 

CONCLUSION. 

I beg, in concluding my report, to return my sincere thanks 
to your Excellency for the hearty sympathy and unceasing sup- 
port you have extended to me in the discharge of my arduous 
work during the year, and to inform you of the entire harmony 
which pervades the State, and especially between the county 
officers and school authorities. 



RRGULaATIONS 

Prepared by the State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction and Adopted by the State 

Board of Education. 



OFFICERS. 

Regulation i. — Qualifications. — Persons, to be eligible 
to appointment to offices in this department must be well en- 
dorsed as possessing, substantially, the following qualifications: 

' 'They are personally known to us as cittaens of good moral 
character, upright, responsible, possessing a fair education, and 
desirous of extending the benefits of free public instruction to 
all classes of youth. As officers, they will be found competent, 
impartial and faithful in the performance of their duties. For 
these reasons we commend them for appointment. " 

Regulation z. — School Supervisors will be governed, in 
the general management of their affairs, under the directions of 
the Board of Public Instruction of the county. 

TIME OF ISSUING CERTIFICATES. 

Regulation 3. — Although a Board of Public Instruction may 
examine teachers and grant certificates, at any time, or author- 
ize the County Superintendant to do so, which may continue in 
force in the county for one year from date, yet it may be found 
desirable to fix upon certain days and places at which this par- 
ticular duty will be attended to. Certificates may be issued to 
expire within the year, to correspond with the times of holding 
the meetings. By such an arrangement, both the board and 
teachers would be accomodated. 

Ample notice should be given of all such meetings by the 
County Superintendents, so that every teacher, or person desir- 
ous of teaching, may have the opportunity of preparing for the 
examination. 

Regulation 4. — Teacher's Certificates of the first 
Class will be granted by the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction to eminently successful teachers of the second class 
who, on examination, answer 85 per cent of the questions sub- 
mitted in the branches usually taught in high schools. 

Graduates of normal schools may receive First Class Certifi- 
cates without examination, who hold diplomas from colleges of 
undoubted reputation and other colleges in which Pedagogics 
are taught. No exception will be made to this regulation ex- 



^L. 



*4 

cept the State Superintendent shall have strong and satisfactory 
reasons for the same. 

Regulation 5. — Third and Second-Class Certificates will be 
issued by the County Boards of Pubilc Instruction based upon 
the following: 

Any person, to be considered a teacher in the meaning of 
the school law, or entitle to compensation for service* or any of 
the privileges and immunities of a teacher, must, at the time of 
performing the services or claiming the immunities, hold a teach- 
er's certificate unimpaired by suspension, revocation or limitation. 

Eligibility. — A candidate for teaching, to be eligible fa an 
examination, must produce satisfactory evidence of being of 
strictly temperate habits and maintaining a good moral character. 

And— 

1 st. To be able to read intelligently from any school reader 

in common use, and properly teach the same. 

ad. To spell correctly the words of any ordinary sentence. 

3d. To be able to write well and teach the same. 

4th. To solve readily the questions involving the rules of 
arithmetic, to square root, and to explain the principles on 
which their solution depends. 

5th. To have a general knowledge of geography: as the 
location and boundaries of continents; the relative positions 
of the principal countries, ocean, seas, and rivers; the bounda- 
ries and capitals of the United States and ot several States and 
Territories, and the counties and rivers of Florida. 

6th. To have a general knowledge of the history of tht Uni- 
ted States and of the State of Florida. 

7th. To have a good practical knowledge of school organiza- 
tion, classification, management and discipline, and of the arts 
of interesting youth and imparting instruction. 

Rule, — No certificate will be issued to applicants who, on ex- 
amination, fail to answer 75 per cent, of the questions submitted 
in the above branches for a Third Class Certificate. 

The following for a Second Class Certificate: 

Second Class. — In addition to the foregoing qualifications, 
a candidate for a Second Class Certificate must, on examination, 
be able — 

1. To read with ease and accuracy. 

2. To write a plain, free hand, and teach the same. 

3. To spell correctly. 

4. To solve readily the questions in any practical arithmetic 
in common use. 

5. To have a good knowledge of geography. 



*5 

6. To be familiar with the English Grammar, so as to apply 
its principles correctly in composing, spelling and punctuating 
a letter, or an ordinary sentence. 

7. To have a good knowledge of the outlines of general his- 
tory, and especially that of the United States and of Florida. 

8. To be acquainted with the elements of book- keeping. 

9. To understand and be able to explain the principles which 
underlie the branches taught. 

10. To understand well the proper organization, classifica- 
tion, management and discipline of a school, the improved 
methods of teaching, and possess good self-control. 

No applicant will be awarded a certificate who, on examina- 
tion, fails to answer 80 per cent, of the questions proposed in the 
above branches. 

REGULATION 6. — The State Board of Education are deeply 
impressed with the fact that the large majority of the children 
in attendance upon the public schools are the children of the 
poorer people, and will fill the large and important classes of 
farmers, workmen, mechanics and artisans of the State, and that 
to impart to them only the knowledge to be derived from the 
school books, excellent and necessary as it is, will but illy equip 
them for the sphere of life to which in Providence and circum- 
stances they are very sure to be called, are still more impressed 
with the necessity of imparting to them some knowledge (to the 
boys specially) of the useful and necessary tools and implements 
used in the arts and trades, and to the girls some training in 
sewing, cookery and housewifery in general by simple illustra- 
tive lectures or talks upon their use, and the general principles 
involved, so that a taste may he cultivated for these very useful 
and important vocations in life, and some knowledge imparted of 
them, but mainly to impress them with a true and proper con- 
ception of the honor and dignity of honest labor. County Su- 
perintendents and Boards of Public Instruction are urgently and 
specially called upon to give their earnest attention to this very 
important feature of school work and instruction. 

Regulation 7, — The evil of intemperance abroad in the 
land demands the attention of all true men and women every- 
where, that its t^de may be turned back, and the great social evil 
abated, therefore the State Board of Education call upon all 
County Superintendents and County Boards of Public Instruc- 
tion to see that the pupils are from time to time, as the regu- 
lar work and duties of the school will permit, impressed with the 
evils flowing from the use of intoxicants and narcotics morally, 
physically, socially and financially, so that a wholesome concep- 
tion of the evil and ruin wrought by them may be had by every 
pupil. 



26 

Regulation 8. — As the spirit of the school law clearly in- 
tends to prevent entanglement at all possible by contracting or 
bargaining among members of the County Boards of Public In- 
struction, therefore the State Board of Education would most 
earnestly admonish all members of these Boards to entirely re- 
frain from the employment of persons in any manner who are 
nearly allied to them by the ties of relationship, specially of a 
close nature, and would especially suggest to those who in the 
past have been thus situated to free themselves at once of the" 
entanglement, and that in the future no one will be recom- 
mended for appointment in any relation in the school work who 
contemplates such employment. 

A very considerable part of the dissatisfaction which does ex- 
ist in some school neighborhoods is created by this condition of 
affairs, and the general cause of education in the State must be 
relieved of it. 

Regulation 9. — All teachers should of their own purpose 
seek from time to time to advance the class of their certificates 
by diligent and persistent study and the constant reading of the 
best journals of school work, and books treating methods, disci- 
pline and government of the school, and so pass from the lowest 
to the highest grade of certificate, and carry with it the in- 
creased capacity for the true work of the school-room. 

County Superintendents discovering a disposition on the 
part of certain teachers to remain content with any certificate 
they may be fortunate enough to obtain, exhibiting no desire to 
rise higher or to become better qualified for their important work, 
should at once report the same to the Board of Public Instruc- 
tion and recommend their removal from the corps of teachers in 
the county. 

Regulation 10. — All applicants for 1st class certificates 
must apply through County Superintendents, under whom they 
are employed, and have the endorsement oi both the Superin- 
tendent and Chairman of the County Board of Public Instruction 
in every case. 

The authority for making these Regulations will be found 
in the School Law Pamphlet, pages 7 and 8, section 13, clauses 
5th and nth. 



*7 
Table No. 1. 



COUNTIES. 


J 


| 

ij 

to 


1 

^ I 

- i. 

|! 

25 . 


Total Enrollment, 
including both 
Races. 


IJ 
11 

"^a £ 

.So 

N a 

Z c = 

> 3 & 

4 


Number of White 
Children En- 
rolled. 


Number of Col- 
ored Children 
Enrolled. 


8? 

9 = 
— » a 

hi 


Alachua 

Baker 


106 
35 
58 
35 
27 
48 
78 
88 

6 
78 
55 
49 

7 
60 
74 
24 
75 
35 
81 
511 
43 
57 
57 
17 
16 
68 
83 
33 
111 

6 
58 
81 
23 
66 
74 
88 
84 

44 
74 

28 
til 
36 
51 
45 


64 
31 
44 
30 
20 
41 
46 
80 

6 
45 
54 
33 

5 
37 
52 
lli 
70 
35 
49 
30 
41 
34 
44 
11 
14 
,54 
46 
31 
68 

5 
41 
68 
31 
62 
49 

37 

38 
55 
85 
50 
37 
47 
18 
45 
86 


44 

9 
5 

7 



37 

8 

85 
1 

18 
2 

34 

32 

8 

5 

30 

39 

1 

34 

14 
6 
2 

14 

:V, 

1 

43 
1 

IT 

13 
2 
4 

25 
1 
6 

10 
9 

24 
1 

14 
8 
6 
9 


5608 

943 
2158 

614 

648 
1049 
3130 

680 

79 

3948 

1958 

3181 

484 
3004 
2045 

655 
2466 
1041 
4207 
3656 
1007 
3464 
2058 

33* 

293 
1B04 
3646 

791 
5192 
1295 
2087 
2623 

741 
3300 
2371 
1083 
1898 
2808 
1556 

788 
1951 

730 
1.563 
1554 


3349 
660 

1324 
433 
*50 
784 

2036 
493 

3003 
1074 
2245 

300 
1948 
1136 

503 
1664 

M8 
2277 
2050 

595 
3449 
1311 

241 

198 
1415 
2575 

630 
3044 

191 
1729 
1905 
5206 

taw 

1646 

550 
11140 
1666 
1015 
1884. 

514j 
1842. 

476| 
1033! 

990 


5608 

810 

1848 

310 

466 

812 

1643 

616 

79 

1719 

1948 

1900 

305 

1113 

1431 

434 

2308 

1041 

3963 

960 

978 

sea 

I860 

186 

276 
1463 
1507 

755 
2281 

881 
1000 
1947 

674 
2080 
1310 
1067 

980 
1745 
1126 
1752 

702 
1422 

496 
1349 
1373 


3849 
124 
315 
104 
177 
237 

1487 
64 

2239 

10 

1281 

189 

1892 

624 

221 

258 

309 

3185 

2696 

3400 

B6£ 

sie 

152 

16 

441 

hm 

86 

2961 

464 

997 

678 

67 

120 

1061 

16 

418 

363 

480 

1121 

36 

521) 

234 

214 

281 


126 
1 36 


Bradford 


56 


Brevard , 
Calhouxu . 




m 




27 


Clay . . :-. 


49 


Columbia 
Citrus .... 




81 




33 


Dade 


8 


Duval 

DeSoto 


133 
45 


Escambia 


70 
11 


Gadsden 


72 


Hamilton 


78 


Hillsborough . . . 


36 
86 
35 


Jackson 


83 


Jefferson 

Lafayette 


70 
48 
64 


Levy . . , 


59 


Liberty 

Lee 


15 
17 


Lake 


75 


Madiiton 

Manatee 


91 
34 




183 


Monroe 

Nassau 


19 
69 


Orange 


97 


Osceola 


26 


Polk 

Putnam 


70 

85 


Pasco 


39 
52 


Santa Rosa 

Sumter 


71 

52 


Suwannee ...... 


81 


Taylor 

Volusia . . . 
Wakulla . . 
Walton . . . 
Washingtoi 




i. . . . 


26 
69 
36 
46 
45 


Totals 




2,273 


1.681 


582i 86.390 


63,652' 


58,608 


32.782 


2,593 



I 

F 




If 



1 



I 

I 






> Jt#> j* H(J| WH ^ I 



888888*8 8 S_8J_8 8 8 8 £ 8 8 8 8 SB. 8 8 .8 8 85 8 8 J. 888.8 



v* *■ m^j m*m«4 ort/i u» m 



ita *e Kt* 



* 8 8JTJJ gt fcft g,83#3ft B &!?8!i3£8>S giff-PS 8f3<?8a 8 8<?8 



1H 



8*S , '8la£?s 

.88888888 

* * t* U * *'trf * 



W Oft* HUtlfl U M 



8 8 8 S8 8 8*8 8 8 8. 818ft S"8 8 ?* 8 8 8ft 8 8 SfcjSS 8«_8 8 S81SS 8-63 8 8 8 3_ 



<>*W U ~i*i 



S 8 83t^ 8_a.4.8'aa:8^.Srt 1 , &iS StJi-tfSaS 8 SSS 83£ 8 8 83<S'a><S*-S?£B 



y 



88 



-U 8888888S88888 8 8 8 8 8 



8 88 8 888*88 8 22% 88888 8 



u 3 



8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 



stills? 

8888888 



SSSr 
883 



888 



8888 
888'S 



I Value ...I 
Property, Per- 
sonal and Real, 
in County. 



Number of Mills 
Levied. 



Amount of School 
Tax Raised fur 
the Year. 



Amount Received 
from Common 
School Pund, 



Amount Received 

from the State 
One Mill Tax 



Value of School 
Property and 
Ground! in each 
County. 



Value of Furni- 
ture in Each 
School. 



00 



? 



H 

00 



2 9 
Table No. 3. 



I 



COUNTLES. 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bradford . . . 
Brevard .... 

Calhoun 

Citrua 

Clay 

Columbia . . . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia . . . 
Franklin . . . . 

Gadsden 

Hamilton . . . 
Hernando , . . 
Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson . . . . 
Lsfavette . . . 

Lake. 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange 

Osceola 

Pasco ... 

Polk 

Putnam 

St, Johns 

Santa R< ssa . . 

Sumter 

Suwannee . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla .... 

Walton 

Washington . 

Totals . . . 






1,2ft 1 ) 
413 
830 
374 
290 
346 
418 
848 
94 

1,029 
887 
93* 
182 
549 
7.17 
320 

1,129 
543 
958 
550 
514 
749 
136 
386 
748 
108 
698 
410 

1.013 
390 
534 

99a 

336 
561 

1.050 
695 
517 
874 
531 
906 
888 
750 
243 
734 
692 



& ■ 

^ ft 

;l 

o - 
■§§ 






1.244*19,845 92 
407 8,796 00 
1,463 00 
4,970 45 
1,714 00 
3.561 B0 

5,88500 

8,465 45 



770 
236 
176 
270 
393 
795 
86 
919 
923 
962 
160 
563 
664 
214 

1,077 
499 
835 
723 
459 
714 
141 
296 
612! 
78 
694 
335 

1.218 
441 
556 
954 
338 
.".76 

1.030 
815i 
463: 

m 

90S] 
846 
350 
072 
253 
615 
5*1 



£ 

s 

°g 

- = 

3.3 



1 



75i» 00 
21X1 00 
300 00 

500 oo 

50 00 
345 00 
350 00 
485 00 



26,904 35,621 



6,882 00 

4.705 00 
15,777 00 
1,915 00 
8,533 50 
8,730 00 



17,590 00 
2,520 00 

10,474 00 
8,744 75 
8,081 30 

15,908 53 



9,931 39 

635 00 

9.55 00 

9,336 10 

25 00 

23,692 95 

"7,427*66 

80,000 00 

4.610 83 

6,771 30 

18,500 00 

18,306 15 

7,376 65 

H.79H 48 

7.500 00 

7,500 00 

1,780 00 

14,484 56 

2,180 00 

1,454 50 

3,013 00 



417 00 
.300 00 
900 00 
75 00 
575 00 

896 en 

450 00 
,000 00 
300 00 
300 00 
650 00 
179 85 
051 75 
250 00 
.030 00 
400 00 
150 00 
7X4 t«i 
305 00 
910 IK) 
4W0 00 
619 93 
,200 00 
458 87 
549 M 
800 00 
645 59 
450 00 
600,50 
600 00 
,000 00 
150 00 
B8S81 
175 00 
200 00 
240 00 



281 00 
132 00 
310 00 
104 00 
366 00 
21MH> 
163 40 
125 40 





A 




"s 


*jP->'-3 


4a 


□ 


a - 


a~ = 


t" & 


< 


a * 



393 00 
■>7.-. im 

1,271 00 

96 00 
2i IS 40 
338 00 
221 80 
350 00 

74 60 
460 00 
1,494 98 
39990 
594 00 
178 0(1 
214 (HI 
188 20 
237 40 
2rt4 +lt 

60 60 
423 60 



1.281 20 
407 40 
290 60 
880 00 

aw oo 

80S 10 
405 16 
335 40 

189 80 

* lW 40 
395 26 
124 00 
228 00 
263 50 



11,708 M 

30 00 

45 00 

565 74 

60 00 

80 21 

1,47880 

1,868 7:4 



118 00 

5.400 00 

1,161 00 

250 00 

595 74 

540 00 

86 89 

500 00 

16 50 

13 50 

1,048 55 

75 00 

415 73 

838 14 

43 67 

33 35 

32 15 

88 Hi 

344 33 

1,938 46 



8,561 81 

633 98 

434 61 

3,202 80 

600 00 

50 70 

3,931 27 

442 42 

418 87 

12 05 

75 00 

9750 

60 00 

16 00 

159 84 



39 
Table No. 4. 




Baker 

Bradford 


3 

1 
8 


1.574 
« 

-I s * 

5C 

95 
86 

137 
736 


1.565 

63 

171 

48 

73 

38 

100 

751 


ei 

4 
10 

s 

3 
3 

a 

39 


79 
33 
46 
31 


Citrus 


3 


24 
31 


Clay 


41 


Columbia 


3 


52 


Dade 


9 


DeSoto .. 




6 
963 
633 

99 
978 
■»tu 
119 
113 



1,202 

1.270 

11 

340 

6 

1.349 

871 

75 

847 

30 

\.m 

240 
455 
311 

88 

8 
80 
518 
301 
278 
201 
.549 
17 
354 
112 
100 
131 


4 
1,267 
659 
90 
919 
335 
103 
136 

1,067 

1,550 

33 

301 

10 

1,533 

327 

77 

910 

16 

1,664 

334 

543 

365 

39 

1 
49 

543 
217 
385 
239 

573 

19 

275 

122 

114 
150 


1 
48 
33 

8 
38 
23 

8 

7 

18 
30 

1 
15 

2 
84 
14 

4 
27 

53 

4 
32 
18 

% 

4 
36 
8 
10 
11 
36 
1 

16 
8 
4 
6 


45 


Duval 


3 

7 
S 


74 


Escambia 

Hernando 


47 
8 
39 
56 
18 




3 
2 
5 
3 


76 




35 




41 




83 

34 


Lee .* 


4 
2 

4 


60 
15 


Leon 


30 


Levy 


46 


Liberty 

Madison 





11 
44 






81 


Marion 


2 


80 
15 






47 


Orange 


5 
1 
5 


m 


Polk 


34 

38 
66 


Putnam 

St. Johns, ,,.,', 


8 


59 

44 


Santa Rosa 


23 


43 


Sumter 


41 






55 




1 


34 
53 


Wakulla 


18 






15 

3 


42 


Washinjfbon 


31 






Totals 








694 


1,718 







3* 



Table No, 5.— Census of School Population, 1888. 





1 


1 \$'\i 


4« : i- 


4- 


I 


I 


is 




I. 


III § 




_z: *2 


ajf* 


1 m 3 

' s-» 

5 | 




COUNT LBS. 


f J 




£- fi- §*S ="S 

s § s§ if if 

3; sr z* ii 

•H Si *! A 


MB" 


a 


I 


11 


3 


8 J 
. it 

c* 4 




8 1 °l 




% 


\ m | 58 '5s | £ 7- 


K 


35 


55 ! 55 


Alachua 


8,763 
1 .24-") 


8.5661 4,453 4,319 3.695 5.067 
l,104j 663 582 958 5»7 








Baker 





1 


8 124 


Bradford 


2,145 


1,880' 1,139 1,006 1.842 803: 





! 2 


40| 807 


Brevard 


1,117 


B78 524 493 ms 1391 


U 


[ 8! 26 108 


Calhoun .... 


898 


802 479 396 858 9171 


0' 


8 71 


Clay 


1,687 


1.574 902 785 1,295 393 


1 


! 1 


53 


324 


Columbia . . . 


4,404 


3.875] 2,842. 2,068 2.341 2,063 


1 


73 


768 


Citrus 


748 
149 


689 441 808 677 72i 
101 77 42 114 1 5 










Dade 


a 





2 


14 


Duval 


8,089 


7.300 4,104 3.935 3,318 4,8*3 


39 


22 


163 


1,240 


De Soto 


2,043 


i.786 1,088 955 2,018 25 








7 


318 


Escambia . . . 


5,868 


4.991 3,048 2,922 3,254 2,614 


1 


3 


92 750 


Franklin .... 


715 


612 Ifia 861 488 227 








88; 160 


Gadsden .... 


5,091 


4,613 2,.">2!f 2.562 1.602 3.489 





13 


73 331 


Hamilton 


3.846 


2.493 1.474 1.872 1,787 1.059 


i 


1 


87 357 


Hernando . . . 


821 


77M 415 406 571 250 








7 


12 


Hillsborough 


4.014 


3,522 2,142' 1,882 3.30S 819 





1 


94 


758 


Holmes 


1,64:? 


I,4;12 852 790 1.580 5ii 


2 


2 


81 


136 


Jackson 


3,705 


2,968 


1,044 1,761 1.95«: 1,749 


17 


« 


106 


148 


Jefferson .... 


7,719 


6,798 


4,101 3.618 1,430 6,289 


1 


2 


48 459 


Lafayette . . . 


1,480 


1.208 


828 652 1,412 68 


1 


' 1 


86 886 




9,008 


7.672 4,611 4,397 842 8.166 





1 


188} 775 




1,897 


I ,826' 1,007 890 1.360 687 








36 235 


Liberty. 


458 


4MI 


239 218 233 225 








4' 45 


Lee 


374 


316 


208 566 867, 17, 








5 45 




2,046 


2,401 


1,348 1,298 2,022 624 


1 


2 


61 


887 


Madison 


4,441 


8,998 


2,286 2,155 1.865 2,576 





3 


87 


488 


Manatee 


702 


688 1 372 330 662 40 








7 


89 




7,845 


6.894 3.976 3.885 3,389 4.472 


6 


8 


212 


1,063 


Monroe 


5,979 


4.4791 2.111 2,388 3,141 1,388; 








m 


759 


Nas»au. 


8,450 


2,787 1,786, 1.664 1,644 1,806 


8 


6 


81 


448 


Orange 

Osceola 


8,161 


2.870 1,802 1,499 2,378 783 1 


4 





10 


221 


954 


HIT 401 468 879 751 


II 





10 


98 


Polk 


2,955 


3.TW 1.502 1,425 2,667' 388| 


1 





57 


174 


Putnam 


2,940 


2,727 1.490 1.450 1,117, 1,823, 








46 


37 


Pasco ....... 


1,811 


1,334, 716, 595 1,299 12 


1 





8 


38 


St. Johns 


2,445 


2,109; 1,086] 1,073 1.410 899 








37 


138 


Santa Rosa. . 


2,908 


2,4«9 : 1.601 1,307 2,170 738, 





3 


30 


40 


Sumter 


1,452 


1,373 795 6.57 l,019i 433 








3 


58 


Suwannee. . . 1 


2,335 


3,067 ! 1.251! 1,084' 1,4961 839 


3 


8 


m 


402 


Taylor i 


1,073 


926 590! 483 1,021 1 52 








m 


234 


Volusia. 


1,973 


1,842 1,024 


948. 1.504 468 


8 


1 


21 


198 


"Wakulla.... 1 


871 


752] 388 


362 .156' 315 





2 


10 


las 


Walton | 


1,500 


1.275 813 


697 1.266 241 





2 








Washington , 


1,339, 


1,210i 715 824' 1.120 219 

* 





1 


35 


224 


Totals., , 


120,112 


1 13,647 65,81 2' 63.300 68 .5 14' 60 .598' 


83 


87 


2.016 


12,564 



LIST OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 






COUNTY. 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bradford. . . . 

Brevard 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay. ...• 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval...- . ... 

Escambia 

Franklin,, . , 

Gadsden 

Hamilton. . , . 

Hernando 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson.. .-. . . 

Jefferson. . . . 

Lafayette. . . 

B Lake 

LiEE. . 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee . 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange 

Osceola 

Pasco .•.. 

Polk 

Putnam 

St. Johns 

Santa Rosa... 

Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor. ... ... 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton . . 

Washington. . 



W. X. Sheats 

G. E. Blair 

Joseph L. Hill 

John II. Sams , 

N. A. Hanly 

E. A. Harrison 

E. E. Ranktn 

E. G. Persons 

E.Gale 

H. E. Carleton 

Wm. M. Ledwith 

X. B. Cook 

Wm. T. Mahler 

C. E. L. Allison 

Geo, J. Graham 

Dr. J. R. Temple. . 

l w. buchholz 

Whttmill Curry 

Wm. M. Farrior 

J. A. Walker 

Zachariah Jones 

John C. Comfton 

D. C. Kantz 

N. W. Eppes 

Shelton Phillips 

T. J. Gregory 

R> L. Williams 

E. M. Graham 

Marion L, Payne 

Fernando Figueredo. 
Ephriam Harrison . . . 

John T, Beeks 

J. V. Spears , 

R. M. Ray 

S. S. NlBLACK 

Alex. Strauz 

Peter Arnow 

Geo. W. Curtis 

C. Whitfield 

A. W. Mizell 

John R. Kelly 

N. S. C. Perkins . 

R. B. Forbes 

John A. Campbell. 



POSTOFF1CR. 



L. L. Charles I Vernon. 



Gainesville, 

McCiennr, 

Lake Butler. 

Courtney. 

Blountstown. 

Lecanto. 

Green Cove Springs. 

Fort Whjte. 

Lake Worth. 

Fort Green. 

Jacksonville. 

Pensarola. , 

Apalachicola. 

Guiney. 

Jennings. 

Brooks ville. 

Bloom ingdale. 

Izagora. 

CampbelltoB. 

AuciJla. 

New Troy. 

Tavares. 

Fort Myers. 

Tallahassee. 

Bronson. 

Bristol. 

Madison. 

Braidentown, 

Ocala. 

Key West 

DyaU. 

Orlando. 

Kissiinmee. 

Dade City. 

Lakeland. 

Palatka. 

St. Augustine. 

Milton. 

Sumterrille. 

Wei born. 

Spring Warrior. 

DeLand. 

Crawford ville. 

Ponce de Leon. 



i 



I 

,1